WHAT  TO  BRING

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Know what to pack before you go…. it will serve to make your trip easier and more fulfilling.
   
Passport and visa

US citizens traveling to Brazil need to obtain a visa in advance. Brazil requires this of any country requiring visas in advance for Brazilian citizens (we believe this requirement should be lifted - on both sides). Please see our Visa Information page on how to acquire a visa to enter Brazil.

Money

A mixture of traveler's checks and cash is best, with ATM and credit cards as backup sources of money. You don't always get the best rate of exchange with traveler's checks, but they are a way of guarding against loss or theft of your money. For further info, check our Currency page and our ATM Locator page.

Luggage

Do not over pack. It is always wise to pack light; those who overburden themselves with luggage regret it later. Ecobrazil.com recommends that you bring no more than one medium-sized suitcase and a carry-on. In your carry-on, bring important documents, camera and accessories, a one change of clothes and any necessary items in case your luggage is lost or delayed. We suggest that your carry-on be a backpack that you can also bring into the field while on tour. Don't forget to label all of your bags, both inside and out.

Clothing

What you wear will depend upon the nature of your visit, the areas visited and the time of year. To orient yourself to the seasons, please check our When To Travel page. Casual clothing is the norm for travelers. Suits and ties and skirts and dresses are the norm for business relations (Note: wearing a tie with a short-sleeved shirt may cause you to be mistaken for a missionary!). Brazil usually follows Europe as far as fashion goes. In the north of Brazil (Salvador, Recife, Fortaleza et cetera) clothing is rather casual. Always avoid flashy jewelry or other displays of opulence; don't become a target for crime.
 

- Shirts
- Cotton shirts are the best; linen and rayon are also good fabric choices for the tropics. Bring along light long-sleeved shirts for protection against the sun and mosquitoes.
 

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Pants - Lightweight cotton work pants, safari pants or jeans are recommended. Shorts are fine for coastal areas, beaches and for traveling, but are frowned upon in churches and some museums.
 

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Shoes - Bring two good pairs of hiking or walking shoes. Expensive hiking boots are not necessary, but please take precautions in selecting your walking boots if you have weak ankles. Flip-flops or sandals are great for going to the beach and for wearing around the hotels.
 

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Jackets, coats, etc. - A lightweight jacket, windbreaker or pullover will be useful in the evenings and during the Brazilian winter. In the south of Brazil and in mountainous areas, it can get quite chilly. Also, bring a raincoat or light poncho.
 

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Hats - We recommend bringing a light hat with a wide brim.

Guidebook and Phrasebook

A good travel guidebook, such as Lonely Planet or the Rough Guide is indispensable for finding out the highlights in a particular area and enjoying your trip to the fullest. Please see our Bookstore page for our recommendations. A phrasebook or dictionary for Brazilian Portuguese will help you understand signs, place names, menus, and will assist you in making yourself understood.

Camera and Equipment

 Remember to bring enough film; but if you run out, film is readily available in Brazil. Be sure to check the expiration date, however. 64-100 ASA is appropriate for outdoor and scenery shots; 200-400 ASA is best for shaded areas, museums and the rain forest. Replace your camera battery before you leave, and bring spare cells.

Travel clock and alarm

Travel clock and alarm.

Sunscreen

Bring a sunscreen with an adequate SPF factor. Fair-skinned individuals should be especially mindful of protecting themselves from the sun's rays.

Glasses

Sunglasses with UV protection are recommended for sunny days. If you wear prescription glasses, you may want to consider bringing an extra pair.

Binoculars

Great for spotting wildlife and for scanning the horizon.

Flashlight

A small pocket light makes for a handy aid. Bring an extra set of batteries.

Water bottle

This is not a must, but some individuals like to bring their own water bottle or small canteen. For our adventure tours, this is a good idea. There are some sports bottles available with built-in purifiers, such as Penta Pure, PUR, Exstream Orinoco, Sweetwater Guardian and the On The Go bottle.

Plastic bags

These are excellent for storing wet clothes or shoes. Ziploc bags help protect electronic equipment and books or papers.

Personal care kit

Although all of our guided tours take the utmost precaution in ensuring the safety of our clients, and medical supplies are stored on buses, it is wise to bring a personal first-aid kit. Include band-aids, an antibiotic ointment such as Neosporin, gauze, tape, and any medications you'll need while away from home.
  

- Medication for stomach problems or diarrhea - Dietary changes may cause uncomfortable symptoms in travelers, and it pays to be prepared. Traveler's diarrhea is the most common health problem for travelers - everywhere. Pepto-Bismol or Tums may be used to relieve symptoms of stomach problems and Imodium, Lomotil or similar remedies can be used to treat the runs. For these maladies, remember to drink plenty of fluids (use bottled or boiled water) in order to re-hydrate yourself. Avoid tap water outside of large cities.
 

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Insect repellent - For personal comfort as well as disease prevention, we recommend that you bring insect repellent. Look for repellent with a sufficient concentration of DEET. Malaria has been eradicated from Brazil's Pantanal area, but there is some risk in the Amazon basin region. Anti-itch gel helps relieve irritation from bites.

Repair kit

Include a sewing kit, nylon string and duct tape (for possible luggage repair). Also, a pocket knife or Swiss Army knife is a smart multi-purpose tool to bring along.


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